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IXI

The information for this Directory, showing the

fo twelve chapters and poems. from one to manuscript market and the manuscript requirements

four stanzas. Sometimes buys photographs to of many publications, has been gathered directly accompany

available articles and pays upon from the editors of the periodicals, and is strictly acceptance. up to date.

Kings' Treasuries (W). Presbyterian Board of The second printing of the Directory, which is

Publication, 419 Witherspoon Building. Philadelconstantly being revised and enlarged, began in THE

phia, Penn. boc. John T. Faris, D.D., editor. Writer for February, 1916, and a three-years' sub

A Sunday-school paper for boys of from nine scription beginning with July, 1916, will give the

to fourteen. Can use stories of from 1,800 to Directory complete, together with much other valu

2,500 words.

Plots in which mortgages, hidden able matter. The third printing is now in progress.

fortunes, get-rich-quick schemes, and the supBefore submitting manuscripts to any publication,

port of a widowed mother figure should be dealt it is advisable to secure a sample copy.

with sparingly : also tobacco and firearms.
Stories should be filled with action rather than

conversation, and should not have a tacked-on. (Continued from the February WRITER.)

moral. Serials should not exceed ten chapters
Judge (W), Leslie Judge Co., 225 Fifth ave., New shorter ones preferred. General inaterial should
York. $5.00 ; Toc.
Perriton Maxwell, editor.

not exceed 1,000 words. When possible, clear Uses short, satirical, and humorous verse : photographs should accompany articles. Short jests; short humorous stories, not to exceed 500 articles, illustrated or otherwise, are acceptable. words ; humorous poetry :

short satires,

Manuscripts received before the twenty-fifth of
Does not buy

the month are examined in that month, and ac
Sets length limit at 800 words.
photographs. Pays on acceptance.

cepted material is paid for on the fifteenth of

the month following. Junior World (W), American Baptist Publication

Society, 1701-1703 Chestnut st., Philadelphia. 320. Kodakery (M), Eastman Kodak Company, Roches. yr. (single copy 40c. yr.); 8c. quarter yr. Nan F. ter, N. Y. Soc. : 5C. A. H. Harscher, editor. Weeks, editor.

Uses only articles pertaining to photography, serials : Uses novelettes :

short stories

preferring them to be illustrated. Buys photopreferably of children between nine and thirteen graphs and photographic jokes, and ocasionally

uses short stories and serials on photography years old : general articles ; poetry ; humorous

Sets

Sets length limit at 1.000 words. verse: jokes ; and departmental matter.

Pays on ac

ceptance. length limit at 2,500 words, buys photographs, and pays the middle of the month.

Ladies' Home Journal (M), Curtis Publishing Co..
Juvenile Court Record (M), 1006 Hearst Building, Independence Square, Philadelphia. $1.50 150.

Edward W. Bok, editor.
Chicago. P. D. Herwit, editor.
Uses articles devoted to the benefit of the de- Ladies' World (M). McClure Publications, 251

Prints no fiction, pendent and delinquent child.

Fourth ave., New York $1.00; TOC. sets length limit at from 1,500 to 2,000 words,

Publication suspended, January, 1918. buys photographs, and pays on acceptance.

La Follette's Magazine (M. 115 W.

Main St, Kentucky Magazine (M), State Magazine Publish- Madison. Wisconsin. $1.00 ; Toc. Robert M. La

ing Co., Inc., Mount Sterling, Kentucky. $2.00; Follette, editor.
250 Webster P. Huntington, editor.

Lamb (The) (Bi-W), 44 Broad st., New York.
Publication temporarily suspended.

$2.50 : 10c.

A. Newton Plummer, editor. Keramic Studio (M), Syracuse, N. Y. $4.00 : 40c.

Publication discontinued.
Adelaide A. Robineau, editor.

Lantern
Uses special articles on subject of Design.

Publication discontinued. March, 1918.
Prints no
fiction
Photographs are

Laura Leonard Newspaper Service, New York, usually sent by contributors. Pays on accep

Letters returned by the postoffice.

Leslie's Weekly (W), Leslie Judge Co., 225 Fifth Kindergarten and First Grade (formerly the Kin

New York. $5.00 ; toc. John A. Sleicher, dergarten Review ) ( M, except July and August ), editor. Milton Bradley Co., Springfield, Mass. $2.00 :

Uses news photographs principally, with occa250 May Murray, editor.

sional general articles on timely subjects, and a Uses :

Educational articles of special interest very little poetry. Prints no fiction, humorous to kindergartners and first-grade teachers.

verse, or jokes. Sets length limit at 2,500 words, Kindergarten-Primary Magazine (M, except July and prefers matter not to exceed 1,500 words. and August ), Manistee, Michigan. $1.00 ; 15. J. Buys photographs, and pays promptly on pubH. Shults, editor.

lication. Uses articles especially helpful to kindergart

ADDITIONS AND CHANGES. ners and primary teachers, printing short stories National Marine (M). 268 Pearl st., New York. and juvenile matter for the smallest children, $3.00 : 250.

Edward Frank Allen, editor. and verses for little people. Has special depart

Uses general articles and photographs suitable Does not buy photographs, and sets for its scope ; has departments, Pictorial Marilength limit at 500 words.

time History," Popular Marine Mechanics, Kind Words (M., in weekly parts ), Editorial De

and “The Crow's Nest." Sets length limit at partment, Baptist Sunday School Board,

4.000 words, and pays within ten days of aceep

161 Eighth ave., N., Nashville, Tenn. Hight c. Moore, D.D.editor.

Black Cat (M). Salem, Mass. $1.00 ; 100. Herman

E. Cassino and H. E. Bessom, editors. A four-column, eight-page Baptist weekly for young people, using descriptive, biographical, Uses business and adventure stories; short historical, literary, scientific, and the usual prac

humorous stories : and an occasional love story. tical articles for young people ; stories with an but nothing with a strong sex interest." Has

department, The Black Cat Club, which pays a uplift wholesome adventure, and achievement, told with originality and

with

cent a word for the best criticisms, not exceeding moral note between the lines - of self-sacrifice

500 words, on stories published in the Black Cat. and character-building. Does not

Sets length limitat 5,000 words, and pays on

want love stories, or stories of

young people

acceptance who outwit their elders, or stories with any flip

Parents Magazine (M). The Parents Association. pancy in regard to religion and religious mat. Inc., 443 Fourth ave.. New York. $1.00 : toc. ters, presentation of false doctrines, or anything Helen M. Cramp. editor. to antagonize or compromise the beliefs of Bap

Uses juvenile matter and general articles on tists. Welcomes suitable verse, with sound senti- child welfare. Has special departments, buys ment, but wants nothing trite or slangy ; child- photographs, and sets length limits at 2,500 ish or goody-goody, Sets length limit for single words. or less.

Has published some juvenile

fiction. manuscripts at 2,000 words : serials, from four The third printing of this Directory enlarged and revised

was in The WRITER for March 1017. Back numbers can be supplied. A three-years- w - by beginning

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE TO INTEREST AND HELP ALL LITERARY WORKERS.

Vol. XXXI.

BOSTON, MARCH, 1919.

No. 3

ENTERED AT THE BOSTON POST-OFFICE AS SECOND-CLASS MAIL MATTER

reason

an

us.

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on

we

can't we arrange to publish our own books ?”
As President, I said: “I think we can ; let's
at least try it." So that is one

I am
writing you today.
To start a book department will mean quite
expense to

We will have to depend
entirely on the interest in your book, if we pub-
lish it, for we will have to send each copy on
approval. That means the entire financing of
the work before a penny of sales' income. I
have the data on your book and figured closely
as to all costs. We can allow you 50 per cent.
on the first 500 copies, after that 20 per cent.
All that will be required on your part will be
the purchase of 200 copies at 40c, the wholesale
price, but any or all of these may be distributed
in stores so that you may receive back about
what you paid for them when sold. All sales

our part will net you a profit. We require
this first purchase, otherwise

could not
handle

your

book.
Will you not think over this matter, and let
me hear at once if you can take it up ? You
could pay for the books in monthly installments
if you prefer. Just let me know if I can count
on your book as one of the first twelve, and if
so send me the MS., so I can have one of our
editors get it in readiness ; then knowing the
exact nature of your production I can arrange
the contracts intelligently for your signature.

I would like to include your book in the
first dozen we get out. We have the advantage
of the use of our own columns for advertising,
and we could carry your book for several years.
The royalty on it ought to bring you, an in-
come year after year for many years. Besides
this, it ought to be a source of pride and joy
to see the product of your imagination actually
published and before the public.
Sincerely yours,

H. D. Hitchcock,

President.

BAITING AN AUTHOR.-11.

I received back the manuscript of my 42-
line poem – regarding which there had been
the voluminous and illuminating correspond-
ence printed in the first instalment of this
article - sometime in December. I had al-
most forgotten the affair, and the poem had
been published in American Ambition, when
I received this letter from the Woman's
National Magazine :
New York

Washington
WOMAN'S NATIONAL MAGAZINE
Phone :

400-402 Sixth street
Editorial Rooms, Main 540

Northwest
Washington, D. C. February 20, 1918.
Mr. Allan A. McCorkendale,

Caledonia, New York.
Dear Sir - In asking when your book would
be published, I have just been informed " it
was returned author unable to accept offer."
1
sorry

to hear this, as I thought we
might use your book of verse a premium
book. The whole affair has started us thinking
here.
can place an order with

a pub.
lisher for books for our readers, using them as
premiums and selling them on publisher's com-
mission also, asked the question : “ why

am

as

(How could an author fail to be gratified
by the suggestion that the royalty on his
book a 42-line poem published, illustrated,
“in volume form " ought to bring him an
income year after year for many years ?
Editor THE WRITER.)

I had lost interest in the matter, did not
have eighty dollars to invest as suggested,
and did not reply to this letter at all. Yet

If we

we

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our

own

as

again, August 2, 1918, the Woman's National Magazine wrote to me as follows :

WOMAN'S NATIONAL MAGAZINE Published at the

In the interests of National Capital

the American Woman Washington, D. C.

August 2, 1918. Allan A. McCorkendale,

Caledonia, N. Y. Dear Miss McCorkendale :

In some late correspondence with a Baltimore book publishing company we made inquiry re. garding the publication of your book and was informed : “it was returned, author unable to accept our publishing offer."

We could probably use your book as a premium if it were published. It is our plan, however, to publish sooner

or later premium books so that we will not have to be continually splitting the profits with other book publishers. To do this we propose to run advance announcements of these new books in our Book Review Department and publish each new book just as soon we receive sufficient advance orders to cover the initial expense of the production. From the data to hand on your book we would be pleased to arrange for its publication under this plan.

We propose to devote considerable space to the description of the plan and of the books in our Book Department and urge our readers to send in advance orders for these new volumes, of course adding some attractive combination or subscription inducement. As we figure our circulation will reach about 75,000 copies monthly in the course of a few months our book announcement ought to pull thousands of advance orders, Your book announced under this plan will receive its share and when the proper num. ber come in we will put it out at no cost to you whatever and pay you a 20 per cent. royalty on all copies sold.

Under this arrangement you get three months' publicity in our magazine, at much less than regular advertising space cost for similar matter, Our regular rate to publishers is $20 for three months. As may handle your book through this plan we are willing to insert the review for only $10 for three months. We will send you five copies of each issue so you can distribute them among your friends or as you wish.

A coupon will be provided on the Book Re. view page so that our readers can easily sign this, tear it out and mail to us. The title of your book is certainly attractive and with the proper description (which you may write on back of order blank ) we think this review will show up attractively.

We are going to run our first book announce. ments in the next issue. Many well known books will be included, and your review will be placed in the same list with the works by

[“Ought to," again, is the phrase used by Mr. Hitchcock, who declares that the announcement in the Woman's National Magazine which he figures will reach a circ!llation of about 75,000 copies in the course of a few months ought to pull thousands of advance orders. The Woman's National Magazine is a sixteen-page

paper, 10X14 inches in size, printed on ordinary news print paper, subscription price fifty cents a year. Page 15 of “Vol. II., No. 3” is largely devoted to “ Reviews of New Books," in style similar to this : JIM GOODMAN, THE ORPHAN,* by MRS.

EMILY SHAW. Wherein is depicted the life of a good man, in his struggle for the higher things. Net $.50

(3) Some fifty books are noticed in this way. On the page is printed an Order Blank, which reads :

“ Send

when ready, copies of . for which I agree to pay $ notified of shipment,” with this note at the top : “ Readers are asked to fill out the coilpon below when ordering any book described on this page. Those marked (*) are not yet published, and it is advisable to send your order in at once so you will receive the book soon after publication. Send no money with your order. When we mail you the book we will send the bill for amount due." If the publishers of the Woman's National Magazine get ten dollars for each of these notices, their profits are likely to compare favorably with those the authors of the books mentioned in the “Reviews” will get from the resulting sale.

It appears from the printed letterheads that the Cosmos Magazine has offices in New

me,

when

.

we

50

“A Jewel-Decked Castle,” the figures "200," before "advance orders," and the prices cents” and “

40 cents " written in ) :
BOOK REVIEW DEPARTMENT.

Date, August 2, 1918,
WOMAN'S NATIONAL MAGAZINE,

Washington, D. C. Gentlemen :

I enclose $10 to pay for publishing review of my book “ A Jewel-Decked Castle,” in your pub. lication for the term of three months, beginning with next issue, it being understood that the Woman's National Magazine will use its best judgment in the arrangement and wording of this review

to attract advance orders. When 200 advance orders are received you are to publish the book and pay me 75 per cent. of proceeds. Book to retail at $ .50 ; wholesale at $.40 per copy. Five copies of each issue of your magazine containing this review are to be sent to on publication (Author please suggest review desired and write same on back of this order ).

Name......

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York, London, and Washington ; that the McLean Company has offices in New York, Baltimore, and Washington ; that the Saulsbury Publishing Company has a New York office at 305 Broadway, telephone Worth 2130, and a Cleveland office in the Schofield Building, telephone, Main, 5268. The superintendent of the Cleveland Telephone Company reports that he is unable to find any listing of the Saulsbury Publishing Company in the Directory issues covering the period between October, 1917, and February, 1918. The manager of the New York Telephone Company says that the subscriber for telephone service at 305 Broadway, telephone Worth, 2130, is the Davenport Development Company, which has had the service for a number of years. The manager of the Baltimore Telephone Company says that the addresses Rippel Building and 7 Clay Street are both the same location. Editor THE WRITER.)

With this letter was enclosed the following order blank (a printed form, with the date“ August 2, 1918," the title of my poem,

as

me

Address.....

State..

Once again I declined. CALEDONIA, N. Y.

Allan McCorkendale.

THE MECHANISM OF THE NOVEL.

CHAPTER VI.

SETTING ( Continued ). Influential Setting

Characters as Creating or Choosing Their Surrounding Atmosphere.

Influential Setting. There is still another treatment of setting based upon a recognition of the scientific principle that environment moulds character and determines the course of human conduct. Such a treatment subserves the great artistic law of economy : description of nature and background do not exist for their own inherent beauty, nor solely for purposes of analogy or contrast with human emotion, but are an integral part of the story itself. The Characters of Zane Grey.

Most of the characters in Zane Grey's stirring tales of

adventure appear to be products of their surroundings. In “Desert Gold " Grey says of Yaqui the Indian : “Gale had never seen the Indian's face change its hard, red-bronze calm. It was the color and the flintiness and the character of the lava at his feet."

Four American Novels. Montrose J. Moses places in the same category four American novels, Hawthorne's “The Scarlet Letter," Norris's “The Octopus," James Lane Allen's “The Reign of Law," and Ellen Glasgow's “ The Deliverance.” He declares that each one of these novels “impresses us with the undoubted fact that the situations, as well as the spiritual and physical development of the characters, are dependent on the soil which nurtured them."

Hawthorne and Influential Environment. The importance which Hawthorne attaches to

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own

as

again, August 2, 1918, the Woman's National Magazine wrote to me as follows :

WOMAN'S NATIONAL MAGAZINE Published at the

In the interests of National Capital

the American Woman Washington, D. C.

August 2, 1918. Allan A. McCorkendale,

Caledonia, N. Y. Dear Miss McCorkendale :

In some late correspondence with a Baltimore book publishing company we made inquiry regarding the publication of your book and was informed : " it was returned, author unable to accept our publishing offer."

We could probably use your book as a premium if it were published. It is our plan, however, to publish sooner or later our premium books so that we will not have to be continually “splitting" the profits with other book publishers. To do this we propose to run advance announcements of these new books in our Book Review Department and publish each new book just as soon we receive sufficient advance orders to cover the initial expense of the production. From the data to hand on your book we would be pleased to arrange for its publication under this plan.

We propose to devote considerable space to the description of the plan and of the books in our Book Department and urge our readers to send in advance orders for these new volumes, of course adding some attractive combination or subscription inducement. As we figure our circulation will reach about 75,000 copies monthly in the course of a few months our book an nouncement ought to pull thousands of advance orders. Your book announced under this plan will receive its share and when the proper num. ber come in we will put it out at no cost to you whatever and pay you a 20 per cent. royalty on all copies sold.

Under this arrangement you get three months' publicity in our magazine, at much less than regular advertising space cost for similar mat. ter. Our regular rate to publishers is $20 for three months. As we may handle your book through this plan we are willing to insert the review for only $10 for three months. We will send you five copies of each issue so you can distribute them among your friends or as you wish.

A coupon will be provided on the Book Review page so that our readers can easily sign this, tear it out and mail to us. The title of your book is certainly attractive and with the proper description ( which you may write on back of order blank ) we think this review will show up attractively.

We are going to run our first book announce. ments in the next issue. Many well known books will be included, and your review will be placed in the same list with the works by

[“Ought to," again, is the phrase used by Mr. Hitchcock, who declares that the announcement in the Woman's National Magazine which he figures will reach a circulation of about 75,000 copies in the course of a few months ought to pull thousands of advance orders. The Woman's National Magazine is a sixteen-page paper, 10X14 inches in size, printed on ordinary news print paper, subscription price fifty cents a year. Page 15 of “Vol. II., No. 3" is largely devoted to "Reviews of New Books,” in style similar to this :JIM GOODMAN, THE ORPHAN,* by MRS.

EMILY SHAW. Wherein is depicted the life of a good man, in his struggle for the higher things. Net $.50

(3) Some fifty books are noticed in this way. On the page is printed an Order Blank, which reads : “ Send

when ready, copies of. for which I agree to pay $

when notified of shipment," with this note at the top : “Readers are asked to fill out the coulpon below when ordering any book described on this page.

Those marked (*) are not yet published, and it is advisable to send your order in at once so you will receive the book soon after publication. Send no money with your order. When we mail you the book we will send the bill for amount due." If the publishers of the Woman's National Magazine get ten dollars for each of these notices, their profits are likely to compare favorably with those the authors of the books mentioned in the "Reviews” will get from the resulting sale.

It appears from the printed letterheads that the Cosmos Magazine has offices in New

me,

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