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the Lords' committee say is attributable in part, to the nature of the standing orders, and the ambiguous manner in which some of them are expressed, and which has given a greater scope

for

opposition. Some of the charges too, frequently made by parliamentary agents, it was admitted on the evidence before the select committee of the Lords, were for services which were not actually performed : other charges were represented to exceed very far the value of the services rendered, more especially as the agent appears to be entitled, by long usage, to a considerable solicitation fee, which is of course still larger when any opposition to a bill creates more trouble, and a more protracted attendance.

The agents employed in conducting private bills through Parliament, are of two descriptions : 1st, In-door agents, so called, who are clerks of one or other of the Houses of Parliament; there are in the House of Lords two, and in the House of Commons about eight or nine. And 2ndly, Out-door agents; most of whom employ themselves in this business exclusively, and are not generally either attorneys, solicitors, or writers to the signet, nor necessarily attached to any branch of the legal profession : these are rather more numerous than the in-door agents.

• The increased number of private bills, and their nature, attest the progress of public improvements in this country They also demonstrate the variety, as well as the magnitude of the interests involved in these proceedings. The average annual expense incurred in passing these bills through Parliament, including the House fees, and the charge of Parliamentary agent, printer, and solicitor, are estimated at not less than 300,0001. per annum.'

pp. 383 — 385. A table of Fees to be demanded and taken by the Oficers and Servants of the House of Commons.1700. To Mr. Speaker.

£. S. d. For every private bill [but see p. 470, No. 8, as to Inclosure Bills.]

5 0 0 For every private enacting clause, the same fee as for

a bill.

And if the bill concerns a county, or counties,
or corporation, or corporations, or in the case of
such-like bills, called double bills, a double fee
[but see p. 470, as to Turnpike Bills.]

To Mr. Speaker's Secretary.
For every private bill

0 10 0

For every private enacting clause, the same fee as for
a bill.
And if the bill concerns a county, or counties, or

corporation, or corporations, or in the case of

such-like bills, called double bills, a double fee. For every warrant, signed by Mr. Speaker, for a new

writ, commitment, discharge, or witness to attend

0 10 0

To the Clerk, and the officers under him.

To the Clerk.
For every private bill :-

For the several readings
For breviating, amendments, interlocutory orders,

and other proceedings.

For the order of commitment
For every private enacting clause, the same fee as for

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a bill.

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And if the bill concerns a county, or counties, or
corporation, or corporations, or in the case of such-

like bills, called double bills, double fees.
For every order upon motion, or petition, or committee

appointed in private matters; or copies of them, or of committees in public matters ; taken out by any

person For every order for the commitment or discharge of

any person For copies of all petitions, reports, or other matters out of the Journals, if under ten sheets

If above ten sheets, per sheet
For every search in the Journals
For copies of bills, per sheet

But if for members
For ingrossing bills, per press
For every hearing at the bar, from each side
For attending committees of the whole House, or grand

committees, in private concerns
And for preparing the report, and transcribing
For reading at the table, and entering in the Journal, a
report in private matters, if long

If short
For swearing every member without and within doors

(upon the clerk of the crown's return upon any va-
cancy) after the sessions begun, and filing the certifi-

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cate, and entering it in the return book
For the test, by Act of Parliament, at the table
For swearing every person at the table, in order to be
naturalized

To the Clerk Assistant.
For every private bill
For every private enacting clause, the same fee as for

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a bill.

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And if the bill concerns a county, or counties, or

corporation, or corporations, or in the case of

such-like bills, called double bills, a double fee. For every hearing at the bar, from each side For attending committees of the whole House, or grand

committees, in private concerns
For every order of such committees
For reading every petition in private matters

To the Clerk of the Committee of Elections.
For attending the hearing of the merits of the cause
For drawing the report
For a fair copy of the report for the chairman
For each exhibit
For the examination of a witness
For each order of the committee
To the four clerks without doors attending upon

committees.
For attending to adjourn a committee upon a private

bill or petition For attending a sitting of the committee upon such bill,

or petition
For drawing and transcribing the report for such com-
mittee
And where the bill or petition concerns a county,

corporation, or body of people, or in such-like
cases, (in which double fees are paid to the offi-

cers of the House) double fees.
For a summons for a witness to attend a committee
For examining a witness, or taking the consent of a

party to the passing of a bill For every deed, or other exhibit, made use of before

the committee To the chief clerk without doors (being one of the four VOL. VI.NO. XI.

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clerks without doors) who receives the fees, and

pays them to the officers of the House : for so doing, For every private bill

0 100 For every private enacting clause, the same fee as for a bill. And if a bill concerns a county, or counties, or

corporation, or corporations, or in the case of
such-like bills, called double bills, a double fee.
To the Serjeant, and the officers under him.

To the Serjeant.
For every private bill

. 1 5 0 For every private enacting clause, the same fee as for

a bill.

5 0 0 3 6 8 1 0 0

And if the bill concerns a county, or counties, or

corporation, or corporations, or in the case of

such-like bills, called double bills, a double fee.
For taking a knight into custody
For taking a gentleman into custody
For every day in custody
From every knight of the shire when sworn into the

House (upon the clerk of the crown's return upon

any vacancy) after the sessions begun From every burgess upon such vacancy From every person sworn at the table, in order to be

naturalized For every counsel pleading at the bar, or before any

committee
For bringing a criminal to the bar
For riding charges, for every mile

To the Housekeeper.
For every private bill
For every private enacting clause, the same fee as for

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And if the bill concerns a county, or counties, or

corporation, or corporations, or in the case of

such-like bills, called double bills, a double fee. For every private committee

0 5 0 For every hearing at the bar

0 10 0 For every prisoner discharged by the House

0 5 0 To the two Door-keepers.' For every private bill

. 0 5 0

For every private enacting clause, the same fee as for

a bill.

And if the bill concerns a county, or counties, or

corporation, or corporations, or in the case of

such-like bills, called double bills, a double fee. For attending a hearing at the bar in private matters 0 7 6 For delivering papers at the door

0 5 0 Upon the discharge of every prisoner, to each

0 2 6 From every member sworn (upon the clerk of the

crown's return upon any vacancy) after the sessions begun

0 5 0 To the four Messengers. For serving any summons of the House in private matters

0 6 8 For serving the orders of committees in private matters 0 2 6 For attending a prisoner, per diem

0 6 8 For keeping the door at a private committee

0 2 6

Perused by me, 22d February, 1731.

AR' Onslow, Speaker.'

OLIVER'S SUMMARY. The Law Summary; a Collection of Legal Tracts on Subjects

of General Application in Business. By BENJAMIN L. OLIVER, Counsellor at Law. Boston. Marsh, Capen, & Lyon. 1831.

pp. 348.

The design of this work, as the author announces in the preface, 'is to furnish a concise view of the law, in relation to certain subjects of frequent occurrence in business. In the selection of the subjects particular attention has been paid to their practical utility and general application. It is believed that little can be found in them which will not repay the reader, if impressed on the memory, and the cautions necessarily arising from them are carefully attended to in dealings with others.'

After suggesting the vexations of law-suits, which it is one of the objects of the author to prevent, he proceeds to say of the 'proverbial uncertainty of the law,' that it'produces contrary effects on persons of different characters. The timid and cautious are frequently deterred by it from going to law in the assertion of the plainest right; while the bold and unprincipled will not hesitate, on the same account, to set up for the most flagrant wrong, any defence, however shameless and dishonest, if it can be brought, though only in appearance, under the shelter of any rule of tech

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